StoppingPower.net Forums
Home
Forums
Commentary
H&S
About
StoppingPower.net Forums

StoppingPower.net Forums - Some battery things I've learned...
StoppingPower.net Forums
StoppingPower.net Forums
Forums Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ | Invite a friend
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Be Prepared
 Emergency Preparedness
 Some battery things I've learned...
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

Dave in PA
Average Member

USA
444 Posts

Posted - September 04 2019 :  6:08:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Most members here are likely already doing this but I thought I might share for anyone who has not yet thought of it.

I have had a couple instances where alkaline batteries have leaked in a flashlight or other small items I keep in my get-home-bag in my car. After finally realizing my lithium powered lights have never done that, even in long periods of extreme heat, it finally sunk in.

I have replaced my alkaline batteries (mostly) with lithium batteries. I have also started storing them in baggies attached to my flashlight or other item so that nothing leaks into the item and ruins it.

Unfortunately I was always that guy that had to ram his head into a wall several dozen times until I would realize it hurt and I should stop.

And my wife seems to think I can't learn new things. Ha!

RLS
Senior Member

USA
751 Posts

Posted - September 04 2019 :  7:53:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have done the same thing since Spring. Too many times I would go to use a a flashlight or other battery operated device and find that the alkaline batteries had leaked. Sometimes I could clean the white crud off and salvage the unit (white vinegar or 91% rubbing alcohol, cotton swabs and toothpicks, with elbow grease).

One day I did an internet search about battery leakage. Alkaline batteries are big offenders. Lithium batteries are stable. And expensive. And a tad harder to find.

My wife asks why I need so many batteries. I told her they are on sale (25% off at Walgreens) and I have replaced the ones in the flashlights, now I need to have spares.

A few of my Maglights have had to be tossed due to the the alkalines, a few of the cheap LED flashlights and one Coast that was stored in the car.

The lithium batteries are advertised to have a twenty year shelf life.


Rick
Go to Top of Page

Arvinator
Advanced Member

USA
5455 Posts

Posted - September 04 2019 :  9:33:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I tend to carry both. In my vehicle bag of "Stuff" I keep the batteries OUT and in the original package. I check every few months. I figure I'll put batteries in them when needed. I carry a light in my pocket at all times, YES all times ( Coast AA LED) and replace the battery every month.

I too, have ruined a couple of perfectly good, expensive Mag lites and said I needed to be smarter...

Be honest, fair, and always prepared...
Go to Top of Page

Vanman
Junior Member

USA
194 Posts

Posted - September 04 2019 :  10:31:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And I thought I was the only one that had ruined a couple Maglights. I did manage to salvage one.
Go to Top of Page

Russ Larges
Moderator

USA
2412 Posts

Posted - September 06 2019 :  08:12:36 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Vanman

And I thought I was the only one that had ruined a couple Maglights. I did manage to salvage one.




Ahh yes, I have also lost some maglights to bad batteries.
Russ

The pistol, learn it well, carry it allways. Jeff Cooper
Go to Top of Page

docglock
Starting Member

17 Posts

Posted - September 06 2019 :  2:00:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Every battery that I have found leaking has been a Duracell. Haven't caught an Amazon Basics leaking yet, but probably should convert over to lithium anyway. A bit more expensive but cheaper than replacing lights.
Go to Top of Page

gw
Advanced Member

4782 Posts

Posted - September 06 2019 :  2:01:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
HEAT

leave alkaline batteries in a hot car during the summer and they'll leak

Store everything with batteries removed

Don't forget those red dot and laser sights......

"Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not..."
Go to Top of Page

840
Junior Member

USA
194 Posts

Posted - September 13 2019 :  05:05:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dave in PA
I have had a couple instances where alkaline batteries have leaked in a flashlight or other small items I keep in my get-home-bag in my car. After finally realizing my lithium powered lights have never done that, even in long periods of extreme heat, it finally sunk in.
For over half-a-century I have used alkaline batteries in my two most used battery-powered devices: Flashlights and Metal Detectors. naturally a few other things but those mainly. A LOT of both are in my home or vehicle. The ONLY time I have experienced any leaking batteries were with one metal detector I bought at a Pawn Shop. It was used and they had it for quite some time, the fellow said. I cleaned the battery holder easily after I removed the terrible Ray-O-Vac batteries. The other was a "good deal" on a close-out new flashlight. Flashlight was new, but it had one or two bad leaky batteries inside. The cause? Poor design that had inner electronic components that applied a slow, steady drain on the batteries even when turned 'Off.' I cleaned that up, also, after removing ALL of the bad Ray-O-Vac batteries. Sold the flashlight at a yard sale.

(Hint: I never use or keep any Ray-O-Vac batteries around.)

quote:
Originally posted by Dave in PA
I have replaced my alkaline batteries (mostly) with lithium batteries.
Yes, a good rechargeable Lithium battery can last a long time w/o leakage. But they are $$$ and come with a common problem. Quite often an average human thinks a long-life rechargeable battery is going to be working just fine when needed, and that can cause them to fall into the trap of not bothering to check them at all or nearly as often as they should. And with a sevier storm or other power outage, recharging those batteries can be difficult.

quote:
Originally posted by Dave in PA
I have also started storing them in baggies attached to my flashlight or other item so that nothing leaks into the item and ruins it.
When I have an urgent need for a firearm, I don't keep the ammo stored in a baggie attached to the weapon. When I have an immediate need for a flashlight, I want it to also be ready-to-use ... NOW!

'840'

Yes, I too have my semi-autos, but folks need to credit the serious versatility of a good revolver with a serviceable load.

Edited by - 840 on September 13 2019 05:18:14 AM
Go to Top of Page

840
Junior Member

USA
194 Posts

Posted - September 13 2019 :  05:30:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Arvinator
I tend to carry both. In my vehicle bag of "Stuff" I keep the batteries OUT and in the original package. I check every few months. I figure I'll put batteries in them when needed.
I have 3 or more flashlights in my vehicle. One is Lithium, the others are Alkaline.

quote:
Originally posted by Arvinator
I carry a light in my pocket at all times, YES all times ( Coast AA LED) and replace the battery every month.
I also always carry my Coast G19 in my trouser pocket. A nice 'spotlight' for many uses. In colder weather, when we have more dark hours and wear a coat, I also keep a slightly larger flashlight in a coat pocket.

'840'

Yes, I too have my semi-autos, but folks need to credit the serious versatility of a good revolver with a serviceable load.
Go to Top of Page

840
Junior Member

USA
194 Posts

Posted - September 13 2019 :  06:42:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
1st weekend in March and in September, all of my flashlights get a check-up and, as-needed, a fresh set of batteries. I also give every flashlight a periodic test at least once on every-other month. Those on my person, in a carry bag or tote, those in my vehicle, and those throughout my house ... and that's a lot.

Some evening I leave the TV 'Off' and get away from the computer and other distractions and gather up the flashlights, a room at a time, then go in my den, close the door, and turn out the light.

I check every flashlight on a white wall and on the dark carpet across the room and at shelves, boxes, etc., to make sure the switches are working properly and the light intensity (based upon it's design and lumens) and performance is 'on-par.' If not, all batteries are replaced.

I save those batteries so they are not touching contacts to drain as most still have some useable life in them. That box of 'spares' are checked with a battery tester and if they show anywhere in the 'Good' range I use them in unimportant things like my wireless computer mouse. Also, grandkids or neighborhood kids, the younger ones with different toys and such, are welcome to those 'free' batteries for their uses, if they want.

Once I have checked flashlights to make sure they are working at or very close to top-performance, I open them and remove the batteries to ensure they are each in good physical condition. Them they all go back into the various places I have them around house, the vehicles, and my pocket(s)...

In my emergency tote I have my supply of batteries and several 'extra' new packaged flashlights. Most of them these days have batteries installed and a package hole so you can test the flashlight's performance. I do that when I also get out the fresh batteries for replacement.

I do this the first weekend of March because it's the start of when I will be going camping more often, and making use of flashlights. And in September because that's when we are getting into shorter daylight hours, thus more and more dark-o-clock hours when we might need to rely on a flashlight, especially if we lose power.

Last Saturday, the 7th, I did my fall flashlight maintenance check, then tallied the batteries I have on-hand in my Emergency Accessory Tote. There are 157 AAA alkaline batteries, and 638 AA alkaline batteries, plus an additional 40 AA alkaline batteries in my vehicle. Only 11 9V alkalines are on-hand, but they are not needed nearly as often.

I'll keep a watch for special sales on batteries I need and use, but I'm probably pretty much covered for at least a little while.

'840'

Yes, I too have my semi-autos, but folks need to credit the serious versatility of a good revolver with a serviceable load.
Go to Top of Page

WR Moore
Advanced Member

USA
1000 Posts

Posted - September 17 2019 :  7:50:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The last couple of packs of Duracells I've bought have had at least one dead battery. I expect I'm moving on to the bunny batteries.

Beware the politically obsessed. They are often bright and interesting, but they have something missing in their natures, there is a hole, an empty place and they use politics to fill it up. It leaves them somehow misshapen. Peggy Noonan


Go to Top of Page

oldmuleskinner
Senior Member

906 Posts

Posted - September 18 2019 :  12:58:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have gone exclusively to Eneloop batteries for AA and AAA batteries. I use CR123 rechargables for my flashlights that use that type of battery.

The Eneloops are great...I have dozens of them.

Each of us is an innkeeper, and we decide if there is room for Jesus.
Neal A. Maxwell
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
StoppingPower.net Forums © 2002-16 StoppingPower.net, Inc. Go To Top Of Page
Thispagewasgeneratedin0.11seconds. Snitz Forums 2000