StoppingPower.net Forums
Home
Forums
Commentary
H&S
About
StoppingPower.net Forums

StoppingPower.net Forums - poly 80
StoppingPower.net Forums
StoppingPower.net Forums
Forums Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ | Invite a friend
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Shooting
 Glocks
 poly 80
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

Russ Larges
Moderator

USA
2261 Posts

Posted - December 31 2017 :  4:02:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What's with this polymer 80 frame? To what advantage is it? Does it not require registration like the 80% ar frames.
I guess it has been around for a while I just seen it on Y.T. a few days ago. Looks like an easy build, even I could do it.
Russ

The pistol, learn it well, carry it allways. Jeff Cooper

Ten Driver
Advanced Member

1799 Posts

Posted - December 31 2017 :  8:03:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They're very popular in the occupied territories. You can use your imagination to figure why.

Mike
Go to Top of Page

Tom-R2
Starting Member

USA
30 Posts

Posted - December 31 2017 :  8:46:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm thinking about it too. I've been watching the videos and reading reports. Very interesting.
Go to Top of Page

Redheeler
Starting Member

USA
10 Posts

Posted - January 21 2018 :  1:03:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They are relatively easy to build. Just need a drill press and a sliding vice and some time and patience with hand fitting the slide etc. I suppose one could do it with out the sliding vice but things could get awkward. Vices are relatively inexpensive at Harbor Freight or some similar store.
I did one just to see. For me they aim better than a glock and have a little fatter grip. I find with Glocks I seem to have to push the front down.

kc
Go to Top of Page

Russ Larges
Moderator

USA
2261 Posts

Posted - January 21 2018 :  1:09:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I do believe they run on polymer rails although there may be ones with steel in them.
Russ

The pistol, learn it well, carry it allways. Jeff Cooper
Go to Top of Page

bandaidman
Advanced Member

USA
1396 Posts

Posted - January 21 2018 :  2:22:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Redheeler

They are relatively easy to build. Just need a drill press and a sliding vice and some time and patience with hand fitting the slide etc. I suppose one could do it with out the sliding vice but things could get awkward. Vices are relatively inexpensive at Harbor Freight or some similar store.
I did one just to see. For me they aim better than a glock and have a little fatter grip. I find with Glocks I seem to have to push the front down.

kc


Welcome to the Forum. I'm like you in having to push the front of the gun down, which is why I've never been interested in the "Perfect" gun. I'd be interested in how you like it after you have finished it and shot it for awhile.

“If for a while the harder you try, the harder it gets, take heart. So it has been with the best people who ever lived.
Jeffery Holland
Go to Top of Page

LittleBill
Advanced Member

4950 Posts

Posted - January 21 2018 :  2:38:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
+ 1

Makes sense if that’s the only way you have to own a semi-auto pistol; not (IMHO) otherwise.


"Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at its testing point"--- C.S. Lewis

"There are some ideas so foolish, that only an intellectual could believe them"--- George Orwell

Slow Is Smooth, Smooth Is Fast
Go to Top of Page

Redheeler
Starting Member

USA
10 Posts

Posted - January 21 2018 :  3:25:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by bandaidman

quote:
Originally posted by Redheeler

They are relatively easy to build. Just need a drill press and a sliding vice and some time and patience with hand fitting the slide etc. I suppose one could do it with out the sliding vice but things could get awkward. Vices are relatively inexpensive at Harbor Freight or some similar store.
I did one just to see. For me they aim better than a glock and have a little fatter grip. I find with Glocks I seem to have to push the front down.

kc


Welcome to the Forum. I'm like you in having to push the front of the gun down, which is why I've never been interested in the "Perfect" gun. I'd be interested in how you like it after you have finished it and shot it for awhile.



I’ve run somewhere around 500-600 rounds through it so far and the more I put through it the smoother it gets. Basically shoots like a glock outside the fact,for me, it pulls up and points better and the grip is larger.

The front rails are metal and the rear are polymer. After hand fitting the slide to the rails (the rear ones are the ones that take work fittin slide to) you want them to fit snug but still slide easy. Then after a couple hundred rounds it wears it and runs well. Get them to loose and you are screwed. That is the most time consuming part , filing the polymer with a little bitty file stop and fit, file , fit ,file fit.

kc
Go to Top of Page

Redheeler
Starting Member

USA
10 Posts

Posted - January 21 2018 :  3:37:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by LittleBill

+ 1

Makes sense if that’s the only way you have to own a semi-auto pistol; not (IMHO) otherwise.




Yea, they aren’t any cheaper in the end by the time you buy all the parts needed unless you have one that you are salvaging parts from.

With as many illegal weapons as there are out there I would think most that can’t legally own one would buy blackmarket rather than spent the time and energy in building one. IMO

kc
Go to Top of Page

LittleBill
Advanced Member

4950 Posts

Posted - January 21 2018 :  4:18:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yeah, and unless the person building it is a fairly skilled machinist— and maybe not even then— I’m guessing that their reliability and durability wouldn’t equal that of a regular pistol.


"Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at its testing point"--- C.S. Lewis

"There are some ideas so foolish, that only an intellectual could believe them"--- George Orwell

Slow Is Smooth, Smooth Is Fast
Go to Top of Page

Redheeler
Starting Member

USA
10 Posts

Posted - January 21 2018 :  4:32:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks bandaidman for the welcome. I’ve been lurking around here for awhile now and thought it about time to join.

LittleBill, I really can’t say as to durability and reliability. I should start shooting it again and get over a 1000 rds through it.

kc
Go to Top of Page

LittleBill
Advanced Member

4950 Posts

Posted - January 21 2018 :  4:47:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
KC, please do keep us posted.

And I realize I forgot one other good reason to do it: if you’re the type of guy who just enjoys fiddling around with things mechanical.

LB

"Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at its testing point"--- C.S. Lewis

"There are some ideas so foolish, that only an intellectual could believe them"--- George Orwell

Slow Is Smooth, Smooth Is Fast

Edited by - LittleBill on January 21 2018 4:49:49 PM
Go to Top of Page

LittleBill
Advanced Member

4950 Posts

Posted - January 21 2018 :  5:37:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just ran into the following online. If I’m reading it right, it appears to be the same thing in M1911 configuration:

Press release: USA, NV, Las Vegas – Freedom Concepts Laboratory, a new player in the firearms industry, has brought something new and exciting with them to the 2018 SHOT Show. The Liberty line of 80% polymer 1911 frame kits is a unique new alternative for those who want to build a feature rich, custom 1911, without the hefty price tag normally associated with such projects.
Developed by Foxtrot Mike Products Inc, the Liberty frames accept standard 1911 slides, magazines, and internal parts.

Representing a reEVOLUTION of the 1911 platform, the frame is made from a proprietary blend of long strand, glass filled polymer that is the strongest available on the market today. Safely and accurately manufactured into a complete receiver with a reusable jig and patent pending, heavy duty, steel rail inserts.
The result is a 1911 frame that weighs 50% less than a standard 1911, and uses 40% less parts. The reusable jig, sold separately from the frame kits, includes all the unique tools needed to complete the process.
“FCL was formed to produce innovative, high quality firearm products that are within the reach of all consumers,” said Paul, CEO of FCL. “We use cutting edge materials, combined with trend setting manufacturing techniques, to push the boundaries of performance.”

In the past, custom 1911 builds have had a reputation for requiring a lot of hand fitting. The design of the Liberty 80% frames greatly simplifies this process, requiring far less fewer parts than a standard 1911, featuring a patent-pending modular back-strap with a captured mainspring assembly, making it easy to finish your pistol.
Bringing modern ergonomics to a 100-year-old design, the interchangeable back-straps are available in different sizes, and the sides of the frame have generous scallop cuts. These features make operating the controls comfortable for shooters of all hand sizes.
On the topic of controls, all Liberty frames are set up to be completely ambidextrous with an aftermarket 100% ambi kit, with at a suggested retail of $75. If you choose not to go with the ambidextrous route, all Liberty frames come with a right-hand magazine release, and readily accept standard 1911 thumb safeties and slide stops.
To support the Liberty frames Freedom Concepts Laboratory is also launching a comprehensive line of competitively priced parts kits and complete top end assemblies. The Liberty MKIV Frame completion kit has a suggested retail of $75.
With standards that meet or exceed mil-spec, and a commitment to continually innovating and expanding product offerings, customers will be able to build everything from a lean concealed carry sidearm to a race gun with all the bells and whistles.
The Liberty MkIX, featuring a full-length grip which accepts 8rd 1911 magazines, will be available March 2018 in the following models:
• MkIX-G Government Model for a traditional 5” slide
• MkIX-Gx Extended Model for a 5” slide with a full length rail
• MkIX-O Officer Model for a traditional 4” slide
• All three models have a suggested retail price of $139
All three Liberty MkIX frame models and accessories will be shipping in March, available exclusively at Brownells and the Glockstore. You can get more information at each store’s booth at the 2018 SHOT Show.
With complete firearm packages starting at $399 MSRP Liberty is within the reach of every hard-working American.



"Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at its testing point"--- C.S. Lewis

"There are some ideas so foolish, that only an intellectual could believe them"--- George Orwell

Slow Is Smooth, Smooth Is Fast
Go to Top of Page

Redheeler
Starting Member

USA
10 Posts

Posted - January 21 2018 :  7:33:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by LittleBill

KC, please do keep us posted.

And I realize I forgot one other good reason to do it: if you’re the type of guy who just enjoys fiddling around with things mechanical.

LB


Yep, that’s why I built one, to see if I could, just like why I built an AK from a parts kit I figured if someone from a 3rd world country could do it maybe I could too. Just one of those deals for the mechanical minded.
Always could take anything apart to see how it works, just sometimes its not as easy to put it back together and have it work again

kc
Go to Top of Page

Ten Driver
Advanced Member

1799 Posts

Posted - January 27 2018 :  9:59:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The first Polymer80 units were G17-sized frame kits, and the rear rails were indeed polymer. When they introduced the G19-sized frames, they changed the design to provide for metal rails, fore and aft. Then, they went back and corrected the G17-sized frames to incorporate the same.

This week at SHOT Show, I shot their brand new G26-sized frame, and I loved it. As noted previously, the angle and shape of the backstrap on these guns is different than the OEM. A friend who was with me remarked that he never liked Glocks because they pointed high for him, but when he shot these Polymer80-framed guns, they pointed perfectly for him. He's sold on the Polymer80 frames now.

Interestingly, Polymer80 was showing completed, serialized frames at the show--they'll be in the pipeline soon for folks who want the advantages of the new frame, but don't want to build their own. You'll buy it just like any other firearm.

Also interesting: GlockStore was showing an 80% G43-sized frame kit, which is the first on the market.

V/R
Mike
Go to Top of Page

Redheeler
Starting Member

USA
10 Posts

Posted - January 30 2018 :  5:53:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Ten Driver

The first Polymer80 units were G17-sized frame kits, and the rear rails were indeed polymer. When they introduced the G19-sized frames, they changed the design to provide for metal rails, fore and aft. Then, they went back and corrected the G17-sized frames to incorporate the same.

Also interesting: GlockStore was showing an 80% G43-sized frame kit, which is the first on the market.

V/R
Mike



Interesting, metal rails fore and aft would be a great improvement. I’ll have to take a look at the 43 .

kc
Go to Top of Page

Malcolm
Advanced Member

USA
4076 Posts

Posted - January 31 2018 :  11:42:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I’ve got a 43 kit ordered from the Glock store. Looks easy enough to ass3mble that even I can manage it. Just doing it to see if, I can. Will keep forum posted

"The measure of a man's character, is how he treats someone who can do nothing for him." (unknown)
Go to Top of Page

Tom-R2
Starting Member

USA
30 Posts

Posted - February 01 2018 :  10:57:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm kinda interested in one of the 80% builds. I see the prices and know it's more than the factory pistol but there is the novelty of making it myself. It may be a summer project. I just need to decide if I want to build a Glock clone or a 1911 clone. I've searched for a used jig for the 1911 to buy that would be cheaper than the full price new one that I may only use once or at the most twice. At least one 1911 provider offers laser cut custom serial numbers, so I could make up one with my LE unit numbers to personalize it. In the end I would expect it to be just a pistol to everyone else without much value. But to me, it would be special. I'll see what finances look like in a few months.
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
StoppingPower.net Forums © 2002-16 StoppingPower.net, Inc. Go To Top Of Page
Thispagewasgeneratedin0.12seconds. Snitz Forums 2000